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DragonTech Writing
Taking the mystery out of documentation

DragonTech Writing is a technical writing firm specializing in documenting software and processes, creating resumes and training materials, and formatting and editing for e-publishing.

Why Hire Us?

1. Software documentation can discover problems within the software before being released and gives customers a learning experience that minimizes frustration.

2. Process documentation can discover problems and in many cases find a solution.  Solutions allow an organization to grow their employee and customer satisfaction.

3. Resumes market your skills and abilities with concise text making your resume clean and precise.

4.Training materials can prevent employee confusion about performance and encourages employee communication with management.

5. Formatting and editing for e-publishing gives readers a polished product that they would recommend to others.

6. We deliver the product you need then we move to our next customer while you manage your business.

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DITA

A Technical Writer has to stay up to date on the latest publishing software and trends within our field. We also have to be able to explain those software or trends to our employers or clients. I started to read about DITA about three years ago and I did not pay much attention. I was hired by YESCO Electronics as a technical writer. Their software choice was Adobe InDesign with their publishing choice being PDF. I was okay with this until I started documenting several different types of documentation that consisently required updating.

I started to read more about DITA and how efficient it could be. I tried to find a way to pitch DITA to the company. However, I could not find an article that really delved into the why should I care as a technical writer or why my employer should care; until now. “Why Should I Care About Dita? by Jacquie Samuals, published by TechWhirl, explains why technical writers should care about DITA. It also has some pointers to bring to management that would make any team look into DITA such as consistency and quality.

If you are a technical writer or a student in this field, I highly recommend that you read this article.

The Changing Face of Technical Writing:

At a recent job fair, one of the recruiters said something to the effect, “They don’t have those any more do they?”  Many of the vendors at the fair were looking for engineers and other technical professionals, but I did find several firms looking for technical writers, many on a contract basis.

The question is, Is the field of technical writing going away?  The answer is no, unless, engineers and other technical professionals learn to use language that clients and customers can understand and are willing to write the marketing and training materials that go with the procedures and products they produce.  However, the technical writing field is changing.

I was recently reading a blog that was discussing changing the title of Technical Writing to something more current.  The problem is, while the field of technical writing is expanding, attempts to change the title would only give upper management an excuse to lower the  wages and professionalism of our field; not too mention create confusion among the field itself and emplyers.  Currently, many firms are eliminating their full time technical writers and hiring contract technical writers or temporary technical writers as the need for documentation arises.

These new developments make work in the field of Technical Writing a different creature.  There are challenges, but there are also opportunities to expand the field as well.  The face of Technical Writing is changing.

DragonTech Writing, championing the cause for technical writers.

By Neil Dabb

Technical Writing Defined

Here’s a definition of technical writing that I am going to use as part of a conference presentation:

A broad definition of technical writing: Any non-fiction writing of a technical or business nature. Sub-groups may include: Computer software and hardware documentation, process documentation, training materials, presentation materials, marketing materials, HR manuals, business plans, resumes and cover letters, engineering documents etc. A technical writer also translates technical jargon into English the rest of us can understand.

Alternate titles for a technical writer may include, copy writer, report specialist, documentation specialist.

Neil Dabb

What can a technical writer do for your business?

A technical writer can update documentation to reflect new information, new images, or new branding.  A technical writer can create or update training materials to ensure employees understand their responsibilities. A technical writer can document processes to ensure that they are understood by employees and are done correctly by employees. A technical writer can interview subject matter experts to create manuals and service bulletins.

We are very proud to offer our services to help your company maintain its standards.